Archive for August, 2013

Title: Google Wants You To Tell It Specific Sites To Rank Better. Will It Listen?

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Assuming that Matt Cutts’ Twitter account wasn’t hijacked, Google wants you to tell it if you know of any small sites that should be doing better in Google rankings.

Do you think Google will really listen to this feedback? Do you think many will suggest sites they’re not affiliated with? Let us know what you think in the comments.

If you’ve ever thought Google is giving too much weight to big brands, I guess this is your chance to weigh in on the better alternatives, wait, and see if your suggestion did any good.

If there's a small website that you think should be doing better in Google, tell us more here: https://t.co/s80BibIBhN

— Matt Cutts (@mattcutts) August 28, 2013

Cutts points to a form, which says, ‘Google would like to hear feedback about small but high-quality websites that could do better in our search results. To be clear, we’re just collecting feedback at this point; for example, don’t expect this survey to affect any site’s ranking.” Emphasis added.

You simply enter the site, and then in a box, explain to Google what makes it better. Here’s what it looks like:

Small site survey

And….go!

Reactions, unsurprisingly, are a bit skeptical:

Laughable RT @mattcutts: If there's a small website you think should be doing better in Google, tell us more here: https://t.co/TKapobseWx

— Ben Cook (@Skitzzo) August 28, 2013

@mattcutts *sigh* well, at least it looks like you care, Matt. :)

— John Scott Cothill ? (@omfg_followme) August 28, 2013

@Skitzzo @mattcutts Should have a disclaimer, "if we happen to dislike the site, we'll slap the shit out of it".

— Jacob King (@IMJacobKing) August 28, 2013

.@mattcutts $40Billion and how many PHD's? And you still want us to do your job for you

— Chris Dyson (@ChrisLDyson) August 28, 2013

@mattcutts can't wait to see the @fiverr offering to submit your website 200 times from different IPs

— Menachem Pritzker (@mdavep) August 28, 2013

@mattcutts just secured his job for another 10 yrs with the "which small site should rank higher" form. Have fun sorting through all that :)

— Nico de Nooijer (@nicodenooijer) August 28, 2013

I really don't know what to make of this small website survey from @mattcutts: https://t.co/t47ycC1EEJ Who do Google expect to fill it in?

— John Swindells (@swinny) August 28, 2013

My guess is that a lot of people will be giving votes for their own sites, and few will be submitting others’. Maybe I’m wrong.

Do you expect Google to obtain valuable information from this effort? Tell us what you think.

Note: this post has been updated from its original form.

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Title: Google Answers Questions About Authorship

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Google posted to its Webmaster Central blog today to address seven questions the company is commonly hearing about authorship, or rel=”author”.

The post discusses what kinds of pages can be used with authorship, use of company mascots as authors, language issues, multiple authors for a single article, preventing Google from showing authorship, the difference between rel=author and rel=publisher, and use of authorship on property listings and product pages.

Google says it only uses authorship when a page contains a single article (or subsequent versions of the article) or piece of content by an author – not a list of articles or an updating feed – or the page consists primarily of content written by the same author. It needs to have a clear byline on the page with the same name as the one used on the author’s Google profile.

“Authorship annotation is useful to searchers because it signals that a page conveys a real person’s perspective or analysis on a topic,” writes Maile Ohye, developer programs tech lead for Google. “Since property listings and product pages are less perspective/analysis oriented, we discourage using authorship in these cases. However, an article about products that provides helpful commentary, such as, “Camera X vs. Camera Y: Faceoff in the Arizona Desert” could have authorship.”

Google only supports one author per article currently, but says it is experimenting with finding “the optimal outcome” when there are multiple authors. Google wants humans for authorship, so don’t use it for your mascot.

On rel=author vs. rel=publisher, Ohye says, “rel=publisher helps a business create a shared identity by linking the business’ website (often from the homepage) to the business’ Google+ Page. rel=author helps individuals (authors!) associate their individual articles from a URL or website to their Google+ profile. While rel=author and rel=publisher are both link relationships, they’re actually completely independent of one another.”

If you’re wondering if you should have URLs for content in different languages pointing to two separate Google profiles in different languages, the answer is no. Use one Google+ profile in your language of preference.

If you don’t want authorship to be displayed in Google results, simply prevent your Google profile from being discoverable in search results. If you don’t want to do that, you can just remove any profile or contributor links to the site or remove the markup so it’s not connected with your profile.

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Title: Here’s A New Google Video About Hidden Text And Keyword Stuffing

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Okay, one more. Google cranked out seven new Webmaster Help videos feature Matt Cutts (and in some cases, other Googlers) talking about various types of webspam.

So far, we’ve looked at three videos about unnatural links, one about thin content, one about user-generated spam and one about pure spam. You can find them all here.

Finally, on to hidden text and/or keyword stuffing. This, like much of the content found in the other videos is pretty basic stuff and pretty common SEO knowledge, but that doesn’t mean it’s not valuable information to some.

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