Archive for November, 2013

Title: Google’s Cutts Talks Link Limits

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Google has put out a new Webmaster Help video about how many links you should have on a page.

In summary, Google used to advise people not to have more than a hundred links on a page, but now you can get by with more than that. According to Cutts there’s no real limit, though there might be. Just don’t have too many. But don’t worry about it too much.

Confused? That’s because there’s no real answer here. The basic gist is just: be reasonable. Of course that’s subjective, but here’s what Cutts says:

He says, “It used to be the case that Googlebot and our indexing system would truncate at 100 or 101K, and anything beyond that wouldn’t get indexed, and what we did, was we said, ‘Okay, if the page is 101K, 100K, then, you know, it’s reasonable to expect roughly one link per kilobyte, and therefore, something like 100 links on a page.’ So that was in our technical guidelines, and we said, you know, ‘This is what we recommend,’ and a lot of people assumed that if they had 102 links or something like that then we would view it as spam, and take action, but that was just kind of a rough guideline.”

“Nonetheless, the web changes,” he continues. “It evolves. In particular, webpages have gotten a lot bigger. There’s more rich media, and so it’s not all that uncommon to have aggregators or various things that might have a lot more links, so we removed that guideline, and we basically just now say, ‘Keep it to a reasonable number,’ which I think is pretty good guidance. There may be a limit on the file size that we have now, but it’s much larger, and at the same time, the number of links that we can process on a page is much larger.”

“A couple factors to bear in mind,” he notes. “When you have PageRank, the amount of PageRank that flows through the outlinks is divided by the number of total outlinks, so if you have, you know, 100 links, you’ll divide your PageRank by 100. If you have 1,000 links, you’ll divide your PageRank by 1,000. So if you have a huge amount of links, the amount of PageRank that’s flowing out on each individual link can become very, very small. So the other thing is it can start to annoy users, or it can start to look spammy if you have tons and tons and tons of links, so we are willing to take action on the webspam side if we see so many links that it looks really, really spammy.”

If you’re concerned about having too many links on a page, Cutts suggests getting a “regular user,” and testing it out with them to see if they think it has too many links.

So, in the end, just ask a friend, “Hey man, do you think this page has too many links?”

Problem solved.

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Title: Matt Cutts Discusses Duplicate Meta Descriptions

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Google has released a new Webmaster Help video featuring Matt Cutts talking about duplicate and unique meta descriptions.

Cutts answers this submitted question:

Is it necessary for each single page within my website to have a unique metatag description?

“The way I would think of it is, you can either have a unique metatag description, or you can choose to have no metatag description, but I wouldn’t have duplicate metatag description[s],” Cutts says. “In fact, if you register and verify your site in our free Google Webmaster Tools console, we will tell you if we see duplicate metatag descriptions, so that is something that I would avoid.”

“In general, it’s probably not worth your time to come up with a unique meta description for every single page on your site,” he adds. “Like when I blog, I don’t bother to do that. Don’t tell anybody. Ooh. I told everybody. But if there are some pages that really matter, like your homepage or pages that have really important return on investment – you know, your most featured products or something like that – or maybe you’ve looked at the search results and there’s a few pages on your site that just have really bad automatically generated snippets. We try to do our best, but we wouldn’t claim that we have perfect snippets all the time.”

No, believe it or not Google is not perfect (as Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt also reminded us).

Cutts concludes, “You know, in those kinds of situations, then it might make sense to go in, and make sure you have a unique handcrafted, lovingly-made metatag description, but in general, rather than have one metatag description repeated over and over and over again for every page on your site, I would either go ahead and make sure that there is a unique one for the pages that really matter or just leave it off, and Google will generate the snippet for you. But I wouldn’t have the duplicate ones if you can help it.”

Some will probably take Matt’s advice, and start spending a lot less time bothering with meta descriptions. Just remember that part about looking at the search results and making sure that Google isn’t displaying something too weird, particularly if it’s an important page.

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Title: Twitter Closes First Day at NYSE at $44.90 a Share

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Twitter Inc., the company known for the micro-blogging/social networking free service Twitter (i.e. a 140 character per-status update (“tweet”) feed in which users can follow, send, and read) began trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) at 9:30 AM on Wednesday. Shares rose as high as $50.09.

This means that Twitter Inc. (TWTR) is now a public company, and upon launch, shares were priced at $26 a pop, initially valuing the company at $18.34 billion.

To put that $18.34 billion in perspective:

  • Yahoo (YHOO) – $33.45 billion
  • Kellogg Company (K) – $22.5 billion
  • Twitter, Inc. (TWTR) – $18.34 billion
  • Macy’s, Inc. (M) – $17.29 billion
  • Bed Bath & Beyond Inc. (BBBY) – $15.91 billion

After its first day of trading yesterday, Twitter Inc.’s shares closed at $44.90, a 73 per cent increase from the initial IPO, giving the company’s worth at the end of the day to be $31 billion. Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams, and Biz Stone, Twitter’s creators, became instant billionaires after considerable returns. The one year estimated price per share is valued at $39.98, which means $39.98 (at this rate) may be the price-per-share as the year ends.

According to Dealogic, a markets service, Twitter has the second largest IPO by an American company, and trails shortly behind Facebook (FB) which shares, as of this time, cost $47.56.

As the next few days follow, Twitter will see an extraordinary amount of activity at the stock exchange, but will gradually fall down just a bit. If you’re hell-bent on buying shares, it may be wise to wait it out a little bit.

“In a few days after the IPO, you’re going to start seeing the stock price settling down a bit,” says Global X Funds CEO Bruno del Ama.

Thankfully as November 7th closed, Twitter’s NYSE debut didn’t result in any technical glitches like when Facebook went open to the public (and the Securities and Exchange Commission fined Nasdaq $10 million because of it) in May 2012. In late October, NYSE performed a successful test run that showed it could handle the volume of buyers when Twitter’s IPO launched.

So how does Twitter make money?

According to Will Oremus at Future Tense, Twitter makes it money “primarily by selling ads, which gain a lot of their value from the advertiser’s ability to target specific groups of users. Twitter’s disadvantage relative to Facebook is scale: It has on the order of 200 million users, while Facebook has some 1.15 billion. But its advantage lies in timeliness and topicality. People check Facebook casually, when time allows. Twitter users tend to use Twitter quite actively, and in conjunction with specific events, like TV shows, rallies, concerts, and breaking news. So advertisers can craft ads tailored not only to a Twitter user’s general tastes and demographic profile, but to what that user is doing at the very moment they see the ad.”

Below is a pie chart that shows what the 200 million registered users in 2009 were posting on Twitter:

As of May 2013, Twitter has 554,750,000 registered users.

 

 

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