Archive for April, 2014

Title: Google Drops Some ‘Upper Decker’ Knowledge (Courtesy Of Another Parked Domain)

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

Remember that story from the other day about Google’s questionable “answers” as it relies on websites to fill in the gaps in “knowledge” that its proper Knowledge Graph can’t answer?

Well this one’s just funny.

Just think of the traffic Urban Dictionary is missing out on. Oh, and the source is a parked domain again. Seriously, read this.

Thanks, phillytown.com/glossaryhtm!

Via Gizmodo

Image via Google

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Title: Schema.org Enters Its ‘Next Chapter’

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

In 2011, Google, Microsoft (Bing) and Yahoo, the big three search engines (Yandex later joined), teamed up to launch Schema.org, an initiative to support a common set of schemas for structured data markup on webpages.

This week, the companies announced the introduction of vocabulary to let sites describe actions they enable and how said actions can be invoked.

“When we launched schema.org almost 3 years ago, our main focus was on providing vocabularies for describing entities — people, places, movies, restaurants, … But the Web is not just about static descriptions of entities. It is about taking action on these entities — from making a reservation to watching a movie to commenting on a post,” says a blog post from Google’s Jason Douglas and Sam Goto, Microsoft’s Steve Macbeth and Jason Johnson, Yandex’s Alexander Shubin, and Yahoo’s Peter Mika.

They refer to the new vocabulary as “the next chapter of schema.org and structured data on the web.”

“The new actions vocabulary is the result of over two years of intense collaboration and debate amongst the schema.org partners and the larger Web community,” they write. “Many thanks to all those who participated in these discussions, in particular to members of the Web Schemas and Hydra groups at W3C. We are hopeful that these additions to schema.org will help unleash new categories of applications.”

A couple years ago, Google’s Matt Cutts put out a video discussing schema.org markup as a ranking signal.

“Just because you implement schema.org doesn’t mean you necessarily rank higher,” he said. “But there are some corner cases like if you were to type in ‘lasagna,’ and then click over on the left-hand side and click on ‘recipes,’ that’s the sort of thing where using schema.org markup might help, because then you’re more likely to be showing up in that at all. So there are some cases where it can be helpful to use schema.org markup.”

Here’s an overview document that covers what exactly is changing.

In February, Schema.org introduced sorts vocabulary. A couple months prior to that, it announced markup for TV and radio.

Via SemanticWeb

Image via Schema.org

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Title: An Update (Kind Of) On How Google Handles JavaScript

Search Engine News, Search Engine Optimization

Article Source: Link Exchange Service Network

The latest Google Webmaster Help video provides an update on where Google is on handling JavaScript and AJAX. Well, an update on where they were nearly a year ago at least.

Matt Cutts responds to this question:

JavaScript is being used more and more to progressively enhance content on page & improve usability. How does Googlebot handle content loaded (AJAX) or displayed (JC&CSS) by Javascript on pageload, on click?

“Google is pretty good at indexing JavaScript, and being able to render it, and bring it into our search results. So there’s multiple stages that have to happen,” Cutts says. “First off, we try to fetch all the JavaScript, CSS – all those sorts of resources – so that we can put the page under the microscope, and try to figure out, ‘Okay, what parts of this page should be indexed? What are the different tokens or words that should be indexed?’ that sort of thing. Next, you have to render or execute the JavaScript, and so we actually load things up, and we try to pretend as if a real browser is sort of loading that page, and what would that real browser do? Along the way, there are various events you could trigger or fire. There’s the page on load. You could try to do various clicks and that sort of thing, but usually there’s just the JavaScript that would load as you start to load up the page, and that would execute there.”

“Once that JavaScript has all been loaded, which is the important reason why you should always let Google crawl the JavaScript and the CSS – all those sorts of resources – so that we can execute the page,” he continues. “Once we’ve fetched all those resources, we try to render or execute that JavaScript, and then we extract the tokens – the words that we think should be indexed – and we put that into our index.”

“As of today, there’s still a few steps left,” Cutts notes. “For example, that’s JavaScript on the page. What if you have JavaScript that’s injected via an iframe? We’re still working on pulling in indexable tokens from JavaScript that are accessible via iframes, and we’re getting pretty close to that. As of today, I’d guess that we’re maybe a couple months away although things can vary depending on engineering resources, and timelines, and schedules, and that sort of thing. But at that point, then you’ll be able to have even included Javascript that can add a few tokens to the page or that we can otherwise index.”

It’s worth noting that this video was recorded almost a year ago (May 8th, 2013). That’s how long it can take for Google to release these things sometimes. Cutts notes that his explanation reflects that particular point in time. We’re left to wonder how far Google has really come since then.

There’s that transparency we’re always hearing about.

He also notes that Google’s not the only search engine, so you may want to think about what other search engines are able to do. He also says Google reserves the right to put limits on how much it’s going to index or how much time it will spend processing a page.

Image via YouTube

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